WHY LOGAN IS KING OF BERRIES IS EXPLAINED BY ITS DELICACY
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Foreign Markets Now Are Being Sought for Fruit That Is Cross Between Red Raspberry, Oregon Wild Blackberry and Dewberry.

By George E. Waggoner.


The Oregon loganberry, a fruit virtually new to the world and known in this state only in the past few years, may well be called the king of all berries, or the aristocrat of the berry family, because it thrives only in the most mild and equable climate and in the most fertile soil. Hence it is the choicest of all, and belongs almost exclusively to Oregon. It is many times larger than the cultivated raspberry, and is a dark, rich red in color and has the delightful tart taste of the wild mountain blackberry. It only calls for limited cultivation, and produces in all its perfection without fertilization and irrigation.

It is a cross between the red raspberry, the Oregon wild mountain blackberry and the dewberry. The hybrid was the result of extensive experimentation on the part of Judge Frank Logan at Santa Cruz, Cal., about 30 years ago. It had little or no commerical value, because of excessive heat, until 15 years later, when it was introduced into the Willamette Valley by Mr. Lafollette. To Brit Aspinwall, of Brooks, belongs the credit for first realizing its commercial importance. At the suggestion of his mother, he was the first to dry the berries in the sun and offer them to local markets, and not until about three years ago was that delightful nectar discovered, when C.J. Pugh, of Falls City, improvised a crude press and prepared for market the first drink of the now famous Oregon loganberry juice. Starting with limited capital and carefully feeling his way, he has produced, after much experimenting and great pains, an excellent product.

Immediately following came the Oregon Fruit Juice Company and the Northwest Fruit Products Company.

The End


2000 Roxann Gess Smith
All Rights Reserved




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